Dr. Beth Patin

Information Equity ~ Cultural Competence ~ Crisis Informatics ~ Epistemicide

Brief bio

Dr. Beth Patin is an Assistant Professor at Syracuse University’s School of Information Studies. Beth’s research agenda focuses on the equity of information in two research streams: crisis informatics and cultural competence. She is the co-founder of the Library Information Investigative Team research group. Currently, she is working on projects about epistemicide and at the intersection of disability and race in youth literature. Additionally, she is a member of the Advisory Board on the Laura Bush Foundation for America’s Libraries.

Beth Patin PhD MSIS MLIS

Dr. Patin named recipient of 2021-2024 IMLS early career grant

INTERCONNECTED: How Public Libraries as Essential Information Infrastructures Enhance Community Resilience

Abstract: "Syracuse University will investigate how public libraries build capacity to enhance community resilience throughout disasters. The project will investigate (1) the role public libraries have previously played throughout disasters, (2) how public libraries can build capacity throughout disasters to enhance community resilience, (3) what critical elements are needed to create a flexible and comprehensive disaster management plan, and (4)the best practices for libraries to collaborate across sectors to enhance community resilience. Research outcomes will develop understanding among library and information science researchers and practitioners about the best practices to plan for disaster management and will lead to the creation of a toolkit and training materials to practically support public libraries in addressing vital community needs throughout disasters."

Featured Event: 2021 Conference Keynote

Canadian Association for Information Science

Unexpected and overlooked: Understanding Epistemicide in Information Science

Abstract: "This year’s conference theme asks us to re-examine our work by seeking overlooked, under-cited, and emergent voices and scholarship, and transformative methodologies, partnerships, and relationships within and beyond our field. Indeed, the information professions need a paradigmatic shift to examine the ways we have systematically undermined knowledge systems falling outside of Western traditions. Epistemicide is the killing, silencing, annihilation, or devaluing of a knowledge system. Epistemicide happens when epistemic injustices are persistent, systematic, and collectively work as a structured oppression of particular ways of knowing. Addressing epistemicide is critical for information professionals because we task ourselves with handling knowledge from every field. There has to be a reckoning before the paradigm can truly shift; if there is no acknowledgement of injustice, there is no room for justice."